Kreischer Mansion, Staten Island - NY - January Events

$ 149.00

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Event Start Time: 8:00pm

 

Event Finish Time: 4:00am

 

Welcome to the one of the most haunted locations in  Staten Island, New York. The Kreischer Mansion is one dark and tragedy stricken location.

 

The Kreischer Mansion, one of the most haunted locations in New York,  is a dark and tragedy stricken location that eerily calls out to paranormal investigators all over the world.  As featured on Destination America’s Paranormal Lockdown and HBO’s Boardwalk Empire, the macabre history of the Kreischer Mansion will send chills down your spine.

From the outset, the Kreischer Mansion seemed to be clouded with misfortune and catastrophe.  Balthazar Kreischer built the twin Mansions as a gift for his two sons, Charles and Edward.  Soon after the construction he passed away just before the Factory the sons inherited burned to the ground.  The loss of fortune and stress of rebuilding led Edward to violently taking his own life in his home.  Charles and the family often conducted séances attempting to reach Edward which may have opened a portal to even more sinister characters from the other side. 

One of the most common sightings is of a woman peering through the windows of the Kreischer Mansion when no one is occupying the home.  A woman’s voice has been captured on EVPs (electronic voice phenomena) and heard with the naked ear.  She is wailing and crying out…could it be Edward’s widow still wandering the hallways looking for her lost love in death?

If the struggle and calamity of the Kreischer family wasn’t enough, the deplorable Mafia hit in the early 2000’s would definitely seal the deal on a malevolent haunting.  The caretaker of Kreischer Mansion was paid $8000 by the Bonnano Crime Family to take out a snitch.  The victim, Robert McKelevy, was stabbed, beaten, strangled, drowned, dismembered and burned in the furnace.  The vile, ominous imprint of such a heinous crime is sure to leave its mark on a location.

Disembodied voices, full-bodied apparitions, investigators being scratched and pushed, arguing voices, slamming doors, shadow figures lurking in doorways—the Kreischer Mansion is a place that both experienced and beginner paranormal enthusiasts will want to investigate!  The only question remains—are you brave enough to undergo a lone vigil in the basement and attempt to communicate with a Mafia snitch?

 

 

In December of 1835, The Great Fire of New York destroyed between 530 and 700 buildings.  The devastation covered 17 city blocks and obliterated 65% of the commerce thriving within New York City.  Early in 1836, a young German immigrant and entrepreneur arrived in New York in the midst of reconstruction.  Balthasar Kreischer recognized a need and soon opened a factory that fabricated clay fire bricks that were in high demand for the rebuilding of “fireproof” construction.  As the business boomed, Kreischer relocated both the factory and his family to Staten Island where he continued to amass a fortune in the new industry.

Before Balthasar passed in 1886, he built 2 identical mansions for his sons, Charles and Edward.  Soon after the mansions were completed, Balthasar died leaving the successful Factory to his two sons.  Misfortune soon hit the Kreischer family when the Factory burned to the ground.  Even though the sons attempted to rebuild their father’s legacy, the stress and loss of his fortune proved too much for the younger brother, Edward, to sustain.  Tragedy once again befell the Kreischer clan as Edward took his own life.

Charles was beside himself in grief and many people talk about the séances he would conduct in his younger brother’s home trying to communicate with Edward on the other side.  Charles’ mansion was destroyed in the Great Depression but Edward’s home still stands and is known as the Kreischer Mansion. 

Over the next century, the Mansion would change hands several times.  Different businesses and entrepreneurs would attempt to restore life back into the ornate gothic home.  But some locations only breed death and destruction.  One might surmise that the Kreischer Mansion is one such place.  Just over a decade ago, violence and death struck again.

In 2005, the owners of Kreischer Mansion were attempting to develop the historic home into as an assisted living center for older people.  They hired a caretaker named Joseph “Joe Black” Young who was a former marine with dangerous ties to the Mafia.  The Bonnano Crime Family paid the soldier $8000 to take out Robert McKelvey.  The latter owed the crime family, particularly Gino Galestro,  money and apparently “had a big mouth.”

Young and his accomplices lured McKelvey to Kreischer Mansion.  They stabbed him repeatedly with a knife and beat him, but somehow he escaped his assailants.  They chased him down and attempted to strangle him but when that did not work they drowned him in the garden pool outside the Mansion.  Afterwards, Young and his crew dragged the body into the basement where they dismembered McKelvey and burned his body in the furnace.

 

The darkness that hangs over Kreischer Mansion is still luring people from around the world that want to experience the paranormal and perhaps  attempt to communicate with the spirits that lurk in the shadows—the victims of violent deaths. 

 

Your ghost hunt at Kreischer Mansion includes the following:

Access to the Kitchen and Basement where the murder of 

  • Access to the Kitchen and Basement where the murder of Robert McKelevy was taken place,
  • Group Séances,
  • Ghost Hunting Vigils,
  • Structured Vigils,
  • Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team,
  • Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters,
  • Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils,
  • Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Tea, Coffee, Hot Chocolate, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.
  • Selection of snacks.

Guests are strongly advised to bring extra warm clothing with them.

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